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Anthony Iannarino
Updated: 1 hour 44 min ago

In a Single Second You Can Decide – Episode 90

1 hour 55 min ago

It may take 90 days to create a habit, but it only takes one second to decide. You can decide right now to do what is going to have the greatest impact on your future, or you can decide to choose comfort.

Subscribe to My YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/iannarino
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Bio: Anthony Iannarino is a bestselling author and internationally recognized speaker on sales, success, personal development, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Anthony’s 3 privately held staffing firms generate annual revenues of $50M. These firms serve some of the most well-recognized brands in the United States. Anthony speaks to and provides transformational workshops to sales organizations throughout the world.

His blog, www.thesalesblog.com, is read by 60,000 people each month, and he has published there daily since 2009. His widely acclaimed Sunday newsletter reaches 80,000 people.

Anthony has continually been named one of the 25 most influential people in the world in sales and marketing.
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Subscribe to my Sunday Newsletter for Exclusive Content: http://www.thesalesblog.com/newsletter

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Listen to the In the Arena Podcast: http://apple.co/2jlSKMr
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The post In a Single Second You Can Decide – Episode 90 appeared first on The Sales Blog.

Targets Are Greater Than Leads – Episode 44

6 hours 56 min ago

Targeting your dream clients is a better and more important activity than calling on leads, warm, hot, or cold.

Subscribe to My YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/c/iannarino
_

Bio: Anthony Iannarino is a bestselling author and internationally recognized speaker on sales, success, personal development, leadership, and entrepreneurship. Anthony’s 3 privately held staffing firms generate annual revenues of $50M. These firms serve some of the most well-recognized brands in the United States. Anthony speaks to and provides transformational workshops to sales organizations throughout the world.

His blog, www.thesalesblog.com, is read by 60,000 people each month, and he has published there daily since 2009. His widely acclaimed Sunday newsletter reaches 80,000 people.

Anthony has continually been named one of the 25 most influential people in the world in sales and marketing.
_

Subscribe to my Sunday Newsletter for Exclusive Content: http://www.thesalesblog.com/newsletter

Read the Daily Blog: http://www.thesalesblog.com
Listen to the In the Arena Podcast: http://apple.co/2jlSKMr
_

Stay Connected Online:

LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino
Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/iannarino
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thesalesblog
Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/iannarino
SnapChat: https://www.snapchat.com/add/iannarino
Solutions Staffing: http://www.solutionsstaffing.com
Iannarino Fullen Group: http://www.iannarinofullen.com

The post Targets Are Greater Than Leads – Episode 44 appeared first on The Sales Blog.

If I Had to Start Creating Content Now

17 hours 44 min ago

If I had to start content marketing today from scratch, here is what I would do.

First, I would make a top 10 post centered around the 10 challenges my clients are facing right now. List posts get traffic, but more than that, I would have the skeleton for the rest of my plan.

Second, I would make a list of 10 factors to consider for each of the 10 challenges that made up my original list. That list of factors would make up another 10 lists posts, giving me 11 posts in total. If I spent some time being thoughtful about that list, I would have a very nice framework from which to build content.

Finally, I would write a single post for each one of the bullet points that made up those ten factors. In total, that would be 100 posts. Adding those 100 posts to the original 11 posts would give me 111 posts to write. There are 220 working days in a year, so I could write and publish a post every other day. That’s enough content to generate attention, and more than that, it’s enough content to start to learn what you know, what you care about, and what your target audience cares about.

If that isn’t enough to get you started, then you start the process over, this time from another direction. This time you write the first list around the 10 attributes or factors that allow your target clients to produce exceptional results. That top 10 list feeds the next 10 list posts, and then you write a single post for each of the bullet points that make up that list.

These two lists provide you with 222 blog posts or YouTube videos to create and publish.

There is something about making lists that makes content creation easier. And there is something about writing that draws out what you really know, and how you really help people produce better results. Video does the same thing.

If you need to create content, this will get you started.

[smartads]

The post If I Had to Start Creating Content Now appeared first on The Sales Blog.

Research Is Not Prospecting – Episode 143

Tue, 2017-06-27 19:00

If research were prospecting, you could research all day and have appointments to show for it. Research is necessary but not sufficient for creating new opportunities.

The post Research Is Not Prospecting – Episode 143 appeared first on The Sales Blog.

Why You Should Never Be Ashamed to Sell – Episode 142

Tue, 2017-06-27 14:00

You should never be ashamed to sell. Period.

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When Did Prospecting Become Optional

Tue, 2017-06-27 03:00

Maybe you haven’t noticed. Maybe you have ignored the signs. The lack of new opportunities. The passivity. The waiting. The belief that opportunity creation belongs to someone else, like marketing, like SDRs, like anybody else.

Maybe, because you can’t see that your sales reps have been spending way too much time with their existing clients, you haven’t recognized the fact that there aren’t enough prospects being moved into opportunities. It would be one thing if there were so many opportunities being created inside your existing clients that you fear outstripping the capabilities of your operations team, but it’s nothing like that.

Perhaps you listen in on pipeline calls where salespeople share the same two or three opportunities they have been sharing for more quarters than make up a single year. When you here the stories, it sounds convincing, like there is a real opportunity, and that you are getting closer to a won deal. The total value of the pipeline more than covers what you need to generate this year, so what could wrong? What could go right?

You don’t want to be some old luddite, asking your salespeople to pick up the phone when you know that “modern” salespeople use the new technologies to develop opportunities. Sure, it takes a lot longer, but you don’t want to come across as old school, out-of-touch with this new millennial generation. They are our future after all, aren’t they? Soon they’ll be buyers and everything will change, right?

What used to be what salespeople do every day is now something they rarely do, if at all. What used to be reported weekly is not reported at all. What used to make salespeople salespeople is now something to be avoided, and something sales managers and sales leaders no longer require.

If you want to produce better results than your peer group, prospecting will provide that result. If you want to create more opportunities and win them at a much higher rate than what comes to you through inbound marketing, prospecting will provide those outcomes. If you want enough coverage to ensure you make your number? Right, prospecting.

If you are a leader, prospecting cannot be optional. If you are a sales manager, prospecting must be required of your team. If you are a salesperson, level the playing field with those who are smarter than you, who have a better territory than you, and who have advantages you only wish for by out-hustling them on this single activity.

Salespeople prospect. It’s what we do.

[smartads]

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How to Interview for a Sales Jobs – Episode 147

Mon, 2017-06-26 19:00

Some thoughts on how to interview for sales. If you can’t talk about how to create opportunities, you aren’t going to do the best job you can winning the sale.

The post How to Interview for a Sales Jobs – Episode 147 appeared first on The Sales Blog.

The Most Ridiculous Idea in Business: Shareholder Value – Episode 146

Mon, 2017-06-26 14:00

Shareholder value is the outcome of taking care of your employees and your clients. No one is inspired to work harder or buy from you because you are trying to increase your shareholder’s wealth.

The post The Most Ridiculous Idea in Business: Shareholder Value – Episode 146 appeared first on The Sales Blog.

Challenging Without Being Challenging

Mon, 2017-06-26 03:46

The idea of challenging your clients and prospective clients with an insight, something they need to think about and act upon, is a powerful idea made popular by Matt Dixon and Brent Adamson of CEB (Now Gartner). The idea holds true because if you are going to be a trusted advisor, you are going to need the advice that makes up exactly half of that recipe. If you you are going to be consultative, you have to be able to offer good counsel, and it is impossible to do so if you know nothing—and if you don’t have a strong point of view worth considering.

The word “challenger” was embraced by senior executives in sales because they recognized the kind of salespeople who create value for them, because they believed the approach was sound, and because they intuitively understood that this is what the very best, most consultative salespeople on their teams were doing to create and win opportunities.

Lately, and maybe it’s just my experience, I have witnessed salespeople challenging their clients and prospective clients—while also being a quite challenging.

I watched a video of a salesperson bully their prospective client into taking the next step by being a challenging personality. Some have praised this behavior, suggesting that they personally buy things from salespeople they don’t know, like, or trust, putting forth the idea that you should push hard no matter  the relationship. Others have suggested that you don’t have to be nice to sell effectively, believing that being nice is detrimental to your results.

The thing about challenging your clients and prospects with an insight, is that a positive relationship makes that challenge easier. So, in fact, does an other-orientation. When someone knows that you have their best interest at heart, it is easier for them to accept your challenge. When you tell someone their baby is ugly, you would do well to have made the deposits in that relationship before doing so, or you better hope you have fast rapport skills.

In a day and age where your clients have many options and alternatives to buying from you, why on Earth would you want to deliberately do anything that would decrease or diminish a preference to do business with you?

Force is the choice of the weak. Influence is the choice of those who are strong. If you have to resort to being argumentative, being a challenging personality, or bullying someone to get them to take action, that is sign that you are a bad salesperson—even if you successfully make a sale.

The inability to challenge while being completely professional makes you something less than consultative, and it deprives you of ever being a trusted advisor. Challenge, but don’t be a challenging personality.

[smartads]

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On the Limits of Technology

Sun, 2017-06-25 04:45

The technological tools available to us now are an amplification of the person who wields them. If you are a know-nothing, then the tools will amplify that deficiency. If you are a deep, consultative, trusted advisor, the tools will amplify that fact. The technological tools available to you do nothing to remedy a deficiency in insight, business acumen, or situational knowledge (the set of experiences that build the capacity to understand how to make decisions around certain challenges or opportunities).

Too many companies want to leverage technology to produce results that exceed technology’s abilities. Soon, we will have “greater than human intelligence” (AI), followed by “greater than greater than human intelligence” (this is what “greater than human” intelligence will design). Right now, there is no “greater than human caring,” and no one is working on that solution. There is no “greater than human leadership” or “greater than human morals.” What persists as a real competitive advantage are still the things that make us deeply human, things like the initiative that comes from caring, the resourcefulness that comes from the desire to make a real difference, and the trust that comes from an intimacy that is not present in technology. Some things aren’t easily automated, nor should they be.

Right now, there are people who are overly committed to the idea that the tools make the salesperson. They want to provide tools and training around the technology. It is easier to train someone the mechanics of using a technology than it is to teach them how to be someone worth doing business with in the first place. Many find the mechanics of technology easier to teach because it doesn’t require the difficult outcome of helping someone acquire the complex set of skills necessary to succeed in sales.

The tools never made the carpenter, nor did they make the mechanic. The typewriter never made the author, the camera never made the photographer, and the canvas never made the painter.

What you want isn’t going to be found in the technological tools of your trade. It’s going to be found somewhere else, and you are going to have to do the work if you want to possess it.

[smartads]

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The Limits of Your Growth

Sat, 2017-06-24 04:25

Your growth is limited by your ability to listen to ideas with which you disagree, explore beliefs that are in conflict with your own, and your ability to take the perspective of another, understanding that they hold some piece of the truth.

You arrived where you are today because you have been exposed to a certain set of ideas about who you are, what you are supposed to be doing, and what is possible for you. You are also here because you refused a certain set of ideas, some of which would surely have harmed you, and others that would just as surely benefited you—had you not dismissed those ideas because you disagreed with them. Maybe the person who shared the idea wasn’t the right person to deliver the idea to you. Or maybe you just dismissed it because you disagreed without exploring any further.

Other people believe things that you don’t believe. Their beliefs allow them to produce certain results in certain areas, and your beliefs do the same for you. To a certain point. But refusing to consider beliefs that conflict with your existing beliefs causes stagnation, arrested development. If you are not open to exploring new beliefs, then you cut your self off from different ideas—and different results. The more you find someone else’s beliefs threatening, the more you should explore that set of beliefs. This is not to suggest that you should adopt other people’s beliefs as your own without serious consideration, but it is a reminder that if you have not changed your beliefs in many years, you are not growing.

Your growth is limited to your ability to take another person’s perspective, to understand why they think what they think, why they believe what they believe, and why they act the way that they act—without judgment. When you can hold another person’s perspective, without judging them, and working to understand the piece of the truth they hold, you are growing.

What you know and believe now got you to this point. What you are willing to change will get you further. Your growth is limited only by your willingness to explore something new, even when you believe it is something with which you disagree.

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The Fallacy of Cost Savings

Fri, 2017-06-23 03:51

When some people talk about cost savings, they are really talking about price reductions. To them, the easiest and fastest way to see an improvement on their Profit & Loss statement is to reduce the actual spending in a category by extracting a price concession. That is, in fact, one way to reduce costs. It is also the most direct way to reduce costs.

The direct way to reduce costs is not very often the best choice when what you cut costs of things that are strategic, and where reducing costs actually takes money out of the outcomes you are trying to improve.

Maybe people are using too many Post-it Notes. Maybe they waste paper. Maybe they are wasting money on things that are unnecessary to the results you are trying to produce. By all means, cut away. But what about spending on things that are strategic, that produce real value, that allow you to compete and win in your space?

For most companies, a greater investment in one line on a Profit & Loss statement can massively reduce another line, generating greater cost reductions than had that supplier reduced their price. One company I know charges 3 times as much for their product than anyone else charges for what is perceived to be the same product with the sales result. Prospective clients are horrified by the idea of adding 3 times the cost to that line on their P&L, especially after bidding work at the lower price. But this company’s product reduces their labor spend by 75-percent, and the cost of labor is their greatest expense.

By spending more on one line, you can drive down costs on other lines. For this to be true, you must be able to justify the delta between your price and the price your prospective client is paying now—and you have to convince them that price and cost are different, and that lowering the price often has the opposite effect of what they’re trying to accomplish.

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Don’t Get Cute

Thu, 2017-06-22 03:00

Today I received a little box from a company who wants my attention. Inside the box was a small toy, and a link to a website, and nothing else. The sender wants my attention, and the offer is a serious offer, even though I didn’t watch more than a few seconds of the personal video on the site. I am the wrong audience, but the sender didn’t know that.

He could have called me and I would have told him who to contact.

Minutes later I received a LinkedIn InMail. The person sending that email was also trying to get my attention. She offered me a chance to play Truth or Dare, the dare being me giving her two times to speak with her about her services.

I appreciate the creativity, and I like the playfulness, but not enough to talk to her about her service, especially since I don’t need it.

Last week, a salesperson sent me a list of reasons that I might have not responded to their email. On choice suggested that I did not reply back because I had been eaten by alligators.

The idea is that by being cute, the salesperson will get attention. They hope by being clever, they can gain an appointment. Different is good, and it can work, but different in a way that makes a difference is better. What is missing is the insight that would make a business person sit up and take notice. What the approach lacks is some compelling reason for me to take a meeting, and busy people don’t like to give up their time without getting something in return. This pitch is for receptive people, who are easier targets for this kind of messaging.

The problem with being cute is that the attention you get may not be the impression you are trying to make. If you are trying to be consultative, and if you are aiming to be a person with deep insight, then starting by being cute may not serve those ends. That said, if your real personality is engaging and entertaining, then go with that (but I have seen the alligator thing 11 times, which means it isn’t even your material).

A couple of the people who have sent me emails like this work in lead generation and appointment setting. They mean well, and their intentions are good, and I am certain that there are some markets where this approach yields results, but for many companies who call on people with the charge of making change, this approach feels too clever by half.

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